May 232010
 
Media_httpwwwmathharv_fikcu

Thanks to Dan Armstrong at Salt Lake Arts Academy for showing me this site. A great ‘end of the year’ resource for you math teachers out there to keep kids engaged and hopefully keep teaching them a little math at the same time.

Be warned… these are unedited clips from the actual movies, so there may be a swear or two. PLEASE preview the clips and standby with the MUTE button if you decide to show these to your younger classes!

May 212010
 

Yesterday I was trying to help a teacher who is trying her hardest to effectively use video with her class. She has done a great job all year, but had fallen victim to the morass that is all of the different video codecs out there for video (both online and with different cameras), and all of the Mac Vs. PC video incompatibilities.

She has also learned the hard way that just because a video is ‘saved’ on her blog does not necessarily mean that she can retrieve that video from the blog to include in a DVD of the class videos from the year.

With a suggestion from a colleague, today I found a way to get that video back out from Blogger that was seemingly locked up in a Flash video container and convert it back to the .mov format that it began life in. Here’s what I did:

  1. I headed to this teachers blog page on Blogger.com, and watched the video in Flash format on my computer.??
    1. a. Make sure that you have a file in your ‘Downloads’ folder called “videoplayback.flv” – this is the Flash container that the video file lives in.
  2. Download and install MPEG Streamclip from??Squared 5. It’s available in both Mac and PC formats, so it plays nice on both sides.
  3. Download and install the??Perian preference pane??from??Perian.org. It’s the “swiss-army knife for QuickTime”, and allows playback for a LOT of the video formats that are out there.
  4. Open up MPEG Streamclip, and then open the videoplayback.flv file from your downloads folder, and confirm that you do, indeed, have the video in question, making sure that the entire clip and audio are intact.
  5. In MPEG Streamclip, head to the File menu, and select ‘Export to QuickTime…” I stuck with the default settings that came up in the next window, and click “Make Movie”. The only thing that I changed was the filename from the existing name to one that made sense for the video.
  6. Sit back, relax, and let the magic happen. Once it’s done transcoding, watch the video in it’s new format in the QuickTime player, use it in iMovie, or whatever else you want.

Note: Do NOT do this with copyrighted video! This video was created entirely by the teacher I was working with, and had no copyrighted materials in it.